Isabel Chiara Collage

on Behance | Artistt on Tumblr

Spanish artist and illustrator Isabel Chiara creates impressive gif collages, some uncannily reminiscent of animations in the Monty Python vein. Chiara cites the great masters of painting as her influences, and that’s something you can easily identify in her gif collages.


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 Bund Sightseeing Tunnel Shanghai photographed byJakob Wagner

This psychedelic tourist trap is a leisurely descent into madness

When trying to cross the Huang Pu River in Shanghai’s bustling Bund district, you can either hop on an inexpensive metro car, or you can take a psychedelic trip through the Bund Sightseeing Tunnel.

Located under the iconic Oriental Pearl Tower, the tunnel was built to be one of the Bund’s major tourist attractions, and still manages to draw large numbers of travelers despite costing more than ten times as much as the metro. Although riders do get a rather mind-blowing (if dated) experience. After hopping into a small, futuristic rail car, riders are leisurely carried through a tunnel which is covered in pulsing, strobing lights that attempt to simulate flight through some acid-soaked version of space. The bombardment of flashing lights and colors is accompanied by a rather ominous soundtrack punctuated by an occasional intonation of English words such as “…shining star…” and “…hell…” It is unclear whether the ride is trying to evoke wonder or terror, but both reactions seem appropriate.

Despite its name, the Bund Sightseeing Tunnel offers no Shanghai sights other than its own sensory bombardment. The entire ride lasts just under five minutes, but the mind-blowing light show could have much more lasting effects

 Bund Sightseeing Tunnel Shanghai photographed byJakob Wagner

This psychedelic tourist trap is a leisurely descent into madness

When trying to cross the Huang Pu River in Shanghai’s bustling Bund district, you can either hop on an inexpensive metro car, or you can take a psychedelic trip through the Bund Sightseeing Tunnel.

Located under the iconic Oriental Pearl Tower, the tunnel was built to be one of the Bund’s major tourist attractions, and still manages to draw large numbers of travelers despite costing more than ten times as much as the metro. Although riders do get a rather mind-blowing (if dated) experience. After hopping into a small, futuristic rail car, riders are leisurely carried through a tunnel which is covered in pulsing, strobing lights that attempt to simulate flight through some acid-soaked version of space. The bombardment of flashing lights and colors is accompanied by a rather ominous soundtrack punctuated by an occasional intonation of English words such as “…shining star…” and “…hell…” It is unclear whether the ride is trying to evoke wonder or terror, but both reactions seem appropriate.

Despite its name, the Bund Sightseeing Tunnel offers no Shanghai sights other than its own sensory bombardment. The entire ride lasts just under five minutes, but the mind-blowing light show could have much more lasting effects

asylum-art:

MONOLITT by Syver Lauritzsen

MONOLITT is an interactive installation that quite literally paints the mood of the city, using social media feeds as an input. The installation takes electronic signals and lets them manifest themselves in the physical world. Using sentiment analytics, the installation links tweets to corresponding colored paints in realtime, feeding them out through the top of the sculpture, letting them flow into a procedurally generated three-dimensional painting.

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Paul Louise-Julie – Dreamy Sculptural Paintings

on Behance

Paul Louise-Julie is a French-American painter and sculptor working exclusively in paper, cardboard and acrylic. Using both traditional and modern techniques, he gives his pieces a gestural and naturalistic effect. Paul places pieces of cardboard and paper in the same geometric harmony characteristic of West African sculpture as well as its hieratic scale. Also, he is strongly influences by European masters such as Klimt, Monet, Rodin, and Eric Joisel. The artist is best known for his 3D paintings. He produces these by placing pieces of paper sculpture onto a canvas, and then adds color and lighting with acrylic paint, thus creating a sense of depth that seamlessly bridges painted illusion with dimensional reality. There is always an interesting story behind Paul’s pieces. In the first picture, the core concept was to explore the illusion of depth while convincing the eye that it is looking at the surface of the water from the bottom. Using many of the techniques developed from “Midsummer”, this piece also employs origami fish as well as paper sculpture. Combined with Trompe l’oeuil methods in vibrant acrylic paint, the end result is revolutionary exploration of depth in the genre of painting. Another work is called “Contemplation” – like the name suggests, this piece explores the relationship between deep thought and personal identity. The tranquility that comes from retreating to the solitary waterfalls of inner contemplation. Smooth, polished surface of the waterfalls also show the parallel facades of the subconscious.

Re-carving Sculpture

Great art changes how you see the world forever. Today is garbage day in Queens, and on my walk to coffee this morning I saw a broken yard gnome on the sidewalk… and I paused. Thanks to Lasserre, I will never see a duck decoy or any other piece of “thrift shop” sculpture the same ever again. That’s amazing.

Kyle Stewart Pantings

Memories are often distorted by emotion. When Kyle Stewart began painting his memories of nature, the details became transformed by the passage of time, affected by sentiment and his new urban environment. Living in downtown Toronto, the shapes and colours found on the graffiti covered walls quickly merged with thoughts of a past rural life. What was once a close relationship became a distant and broken conversation. The figures that now appear alongside these organic forms show the same disconnect with nature that the artist feels when painting landscapes from far removed memories. They struggle to find the words to speak or to make a firm connection; just slightly out of reach, like a fading dream

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Can piling logs be an art form? Yes, apparently. There are people out there who arrange huge piles of logs into beautiful pictures that will gradually disappear as they are burned throughout the cold winter months.

It can all seem a bit absurd until you realize that, depending on the type of wood and how they’re cut, logs actually present quite the variety of colors and textures for someone with the patience and the eye to take advantage of them. There are even art galleries that have showcased art like this. If you’ve been inspired to create your own log pile art, share it with us below!

  1. Created by:Gary Tallman
  2. Created by: Lyn / Neale
  3. credits: Alastair Heseltine
  4. Created by: Gary Tallman
  5. Created by: Gary Tallman
  6. Created by: Olle Hagman
  7. credits by: David Henry
  8. Created by:Gary Tallman
  9. Created by: Gyula Varnai
  10. Created by 

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Brian Despain

In his first exhibit with Seattle-based Roq La Rue since 2009′s Requiarium (covered), Brian Despain (interviewed) is primed and ready with a whole bag of new tricks for his upcoming show next month. Opening Friday, February 11th, Tin Machines and Mercuric Dreams will continue to highlight the artist’s expertise with the brush, with a new series of brilliantly rendered oil paintings of his personable robot characters in desolate landscapes rife with iconography and symbolism for the viewer to draw meaning and inspiration from. This exhibit, however, will also feature Brian’s creative range in three-dimensions, as his first two bronze sculptures will be on display during the show. The early images we have here to share with you, both of some new paintings and drawings as well as one of the bronzes, look extremely promising and set the stage for an intriguing showing on the horizon.